WHS laws and guidance – My Assignment Tutor

BSBWHS331
Participate in identifying and
controlling hazardous
chemicals
Apply information relating to
identifying hazardous chemicals
1.1 Identify and follow
WHS laws and guidance
notes in relation to the
safe use, handling,
processing, storage,
transportation, and
disposal of hazardous
chemicals used in the
workplace
What are hazardous chemicals?
Hazardous chemicals can be defined as substances,
mixtures, or articles that can pose a risk to health and
safety. Hazardous chemicals can be solids, liquids, or
gases and may pose health hazards, physical hazards, or
both.
WHS laws
Any work you do regarding hazardous chemicals will
need to abide by relevant the relevant laws and
regulations governing your territory and industry.
Apply information relating to
identifying hazardous chemicals
1.2 Identify and follow
safety data sheets
(SDSs) and other
guidance to determine
the potential health
effects of worker
exposure to hazardous
chemicals
Apply information relating to
identifying hazardous chemicals
1.3 Identify and follow
SDSs and other
guidance to determine
methods to control
worker exposure to
hazardous chemicals
What are safety data sheets?
A safety data sheet should include information on:
➢ Hazards of the chemical and how to handle it safely,
including storage and disposal
➢ Physical and chemical properties of the chemical, as
well as potential health and emergency response
measures
➢ Environmental effects of the chemical.
Accessing safety data sheets
Safety data sheets must be supplied to a workplace:
➢ When the hazardous chemical is first supplied to the
workplace
➢ The first time a hazardous chemical is supplied after
an SDS has been amended.
Workers can access safety data sheets through:
➢ Paper copy collections of an SDS
➢ Computerised and internet-based SDS databases.
Risk registers
Any person conducting a business or undertaking (a
PCBU) is required to ensure that a register of hazardous
chemicals in the workplace is prepared and maintained.
A register will include a list of the product names of all
hazardous chemicals used, handled, and stored in the
workplace. The SDS’s for each chemical should be
stored along with the register.
Following safety data sheets
There are two key things you will be looking to do:
➢ Determine the potential health effects of worker
exposure to hazardous chemicals
➢ Determine methods to control worker exposure to
hazardous chemicals.
Potential health effects
Chemicals can have effects such as:
➢ Poisoning
➢ Nausea and vomiting
➢ Headache
➢ Skin rashes, such as dermatitis
➢ Chemical burns
➢ Birth defects
➢ Disorders of the lung, kidney or liver
➢ Nervous system disorders.
Controlling exposure to chemicals
Suggested control measures could include:
➢ Employee training
➢ Signs
➢ Warning labels
➢ Use of PPE.
Identify presence and use of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
2.1 Apply organisational
inspection techniques to
identify and document
hazardous chemicals in
the workplace
Identifying hazardous chemicals
Generally speaking, hazardous chemicals can be
identified by walking around your workplace and
locating each chemical which is present. This should
include each area of your workplace, even those you
are not directly involved in.
Documenting hazardous chemicals
Once you have identified each chemical present in your
workplace, you should document this information
according to the guidelines of your organisation.
Documentation should be:
➢ Clear
➢ Understandable
➢ Structured.
Identify presence and use of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
2.2 Participate in
consultation processes
with workers to identify
hazardous chemicals in
the workplace
Consultation processes
Consultation will involve you:
➢ Talking to each other about determined subjects
➢ Listening to worker’s concerns and raising your
concerns
➢ Seeking and sharing views and information
➢ Considering what your workers say before you make
decisions
➢ Advising workers of the outcome of
consultation in a timely manner.
Active listening
Here are some simple steps for practising active
listening:
➢ Pay full attention
➢ Don’t interrupt
➢ Aim to understand.
Identify presence and use of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
2.3 Identify tasks that
may expose workers to
hazardous chemicals
used in the workplace
Hazardous tasks
To effectively control the risks posed by the use of
hazardous chemicals in the workplace, it will be
necessary to determine the circumstances in which
workers are most likely to be exposed.
You should look to identify:
➢ The level of exposure
➢ The duration of exposure.
Risk assessments
A risk assessment will aim to determine:
➢ How severe a risk is
➢ Whether any existing control measures are effective
➢ What action you should take to control the risk
➢ How urgently the action needs to be taken.
Contribute to the control of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
3.1 Use WHS laws and
guidance notes in
relation to hazardous
chemicals to identify
controls to remove or
reduce worker exposure
The hierarchy of control measures
Contribute to the control of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
3.2 Assess effectiveness
of current control
measures according to
WHS laws, guidance
notes, and
organisational policies
and procedures
Assessing effectiveness of current
controls
There are many different ways to assess the
effectiveness of current control measures. For
example, you might gather information from:
➢ Hazard, incident and investigation reports
➢ Complaints
➢ Worker surveys
➢ Consultation with health and safety representatives
and work teams
➢ Workers’ injury management data
➢ Direct observations in the workplace.
When should control measures be
assessed?
As well as according to agreed timeframes, there are
specific occasions in which control measures should be
assessed.
These include when:
➢ A new hazard or risk is identified
➢ A control measure is not effective in minimising the risk
➢ A significant workplace change is planned (e.g. a change
to the work environment or systems of work)
➢ Consultation indicates operational challenges to effective
implementation (e.g. practicability issues, concerns
raised by safety and health representatives).
WHS laws
Under certain conditions, assessing current control
measures will be a mandatory process in accordance
with relevant WHS laws in the workplace.
The legal requirements regarding when a review will be
necessary might differ depending on the legislation
governing the location of your workplace.
Contribute to the control of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
3.3 Participate in
selecting additional
control measures for
implementation, as
required
Additional control measures
Examples of additional controls include:
➢ Reducing the number of workers exposed to the
chemical
➢ Reducing the duration and/or frequency of workers’
exposure
➢ Reducing quantities of hazardous chemicals
➢ Safe work practices, including good housekeeping,
regular cleaning of work areas, etc.
➢ Changing packaging material to minimise exposure
during handling.
Working as a team
When identifying and implementing control measures,
you must consider the experience of every person who
comes into contact with, or works around, hazardous
chemicals, no matter how small or seemingly
insignificant this contact might be.
Contribute to the control of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
3.4 Assist in
implementing
procedures for safe use,
handling, processing,
storage, transportation,
and disposal of
hazardous chemicals
Implementing procedures
To make implementation a success, an organisation
should follow these steps:
➢ Consult
➢ Tailor the procedure to the organisation
➢ Define roles and responsibilities
➢ Be realistic
➢ Circulate the new procedure
➢ Provide relevant training
➢ Be consistent
➢ Review progress.
Contribute to the control of
hazardous chemicals in the
workplace
3.5 Contribute to
ensuring control
measures are
maintained according to
organisational
procedures
Maintaining control measures
There are other circumstances under which a review will be
required by WHS regulations.
These circumstances are as follows:
➢ When the control measure is not effective in controlling
the risk
➢ Before a change at the workplace that is likely to give rise
to a new or different health and safety risk that
the control measure may not effectively control
➢ If a new hazard or risk is identified
➢ If the results of consultation indicate that a review is
necessary
➢ If a health and safety representative requests a review.
Knowing your role
Employees can:
➢ Pay attention to control measures as they are applied
➢ Quickly report any issues or potential concerns
➢ Share ideas about potential control measures.
Support worker consultation
methods for hazardous chemicals
4.1 Communicate
information about
identified hazardous
chemicals, and support
required personnel at
risk of exposure to them
Communicating information
Examples of communication methods include:
➢ Meetings
➢ Memos and notice boards
➢ Written documents
➢ Emails.
Supporting personnel at risk
Support might be provided by:
➢ Having an open door policy
➢ Ensuring easy and consistent access to safety
guidance
➢ Providing regular updates.
Support worker consultation
methods for hazardous chemicals
4.2 Gather information
about exposure to
hazardous chemicals
and possible health
effects reported by
workers
Gathering information
There are many different ways to gather information,
some more in depth than others.
For example you could:
➢ Review existing documentation such as incident
report forms
➢ Carry out observations
➢ Send out questionnaires/surveys
➢ Arrange focus groups.
Incident causation
When a worker experiences exposure to a hazardous
chemical, you should aim to gather information related
specifically related to what caused an incident – this
can be referred to as incident causation (or accident
causation).
Support worker consultation
methods for hazardous chemicals
4.3 Report gathered
information to required
parties including duty
holders
Reporting information
The information you have gathered should be passed
on to any person who you think would benefit.
You might communicate information to:
➢ Employees
➢ Management staff
➢ Health and safety representatives
➢ Stakeholders
➢ Customers.
Reporting information
Information can be reported via:
➢ Meetings
➢ Emails
➢ Letters
➢ Training.
Record keeping
Along with areas such as finance and employee
records, a business is required to keep records on
specific policies and procedures; including workplace
health and safety.
This could include:
➢ Workplace incidents
➢ Risk register
➢ Management plans
➢ Incident registers.
Record keeping
There are two ways to keep records:
➢ Manually
➢ Digitally.
Summary and Feedback
➢ Did we meet our objectives?
➢ How did you find this session?
➢ Any questions?

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