What do you think about the experiences endured by indentured servants and slaves and speculate on how the authorities prevented both groups from uniting behind a common cause to end their bondage?

Respose to ONE of the eight questions below. Your Commentary must have a minimum length of 275 words. Incorporate your two selected primary source documents into your Commentary Primary Sources to be used are linked below. Analyze and comment on any two primary sources in your Commentary. Remember, your Commentary is NOT a review, rephrasing, or regurgitation of the readings but your attempt to find the underlying or “hidden” or “behind the scene” meaning of the selected primary sources. In other words, what is the moral of the story?
QUESTION #1: What do you think about the experiences endured by indentured servants and slaves and speculate on how the authorities prevented both groups from uniting behind a common cause to end their bondage?Base your thoughts on the assigned readings and the lesson essay, and feel free to add any of your thoughts comparing colonial and twenty-first-century America.
QUESTION #2: Select any two primary source documents. What do you think of the two primary source documents? What are the specific themes or ideas in the two primary source documents that illustrate one or more significant historical trends, historical themes, or historical points that are in the Lesson lecture? Base your thoughts on your two selected primary source documents and the lesson lecture, and feel free to add any of your thoughts comparing any time within 100,000 BCE-1763 CE to twenty-first-century America.
QUESTION #3: Do you think the Indians’ economy offered more economic security than the artisan economy that John Fitch faced?Base your thoughts on the selected primary sources and the lesson essay, and feel free to add any of your thoughts comparing colonial and twenty-first-century America.
QUESTION #4: To what extent were issues of landownership, private property rights, and economic autonomy meaningful to working people who owned only their labor power? Base your thoughts on the selected primary sources and the lesson essay, and feel free to add any of your thoughts comparing colonial and twenty-first-century America.
QUESTION #5: Many twenty-first-century Americans believe that the English and other Europeans came to English-speaking colonial America in search of freedom. What was the nature or the extent of freedom at the workplace for indentured servants and wage earners? Base your thoughts on the selected primary sources and the lesson essay, and feel free to add any of your thoughts comparing colonial and twenty-first-century America.
QUESTION #6: When you look at the images under Media Resources for Lesson 03, notice how most people’s work involved hand tools or “human-scaled” machinery. Some twenty-first-century Americans believe that more Americans enjoyed and had more liberty in colonial (and early national) American history than today’s Americans do. (True, men and women who were indentured servants or slaves did not have liberty. The question is more appropriate for discussing free-born women and men.) Do you think that work involving individual ownership of hand tools or simple machinery contributed to and heightened colonial Americans’ feelings of liberty or the desire to expand upon and maintain their liberty? Base your thoughts on the selected primary sources and the lesson essay, and feel free to add any of your thoughts comparing colonial and twenty-first-century America.
QUESTION #7: Assume you are a Human Resource Manager or a supervisor. Would you advocate to your superior that employees must have a wide array of tasks and responsibilities on the belief that they would be more “well-rounded” at work like people in traditional Native American societies? Or, would you hold firm to the concept that employees must have specialized tasks in order to make them controllable, accountable, and/or more efficient? Or, do you have another perspective or approach?Base your thoughts on the selected primary sources and the lesson essay, and feel free to add any of your thoughts comparing colonial and twenty-first-century America.
QUESTION #8: Enslaved women’s labor in the colonial era (and into the antebellum era) was valued around two-third to three-fourth that of enslaved men’s labor even though enslaved women did the same unskilled work as the enslaved men did. This ratio is eerily similar to the pay differentials between women and men employees in late-twentieth- and early twenty-first-century America. Judging from your selected primary sources and/or media resources, do you think that that differentials between enslaved women and men and between today’s free wage-working women and men can be reduced to a common denominator of women having to take time off from work because of childbirth, infant care, and child-rearing?
Primary Sources to be used:
-Artisans–“I Was Sure of Getting a Trade”: John Fitch’s Long Journey towards Becoming an Artisan- http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5822
-Indentured Servants–“Packed Densely, Like Herrings”: Gottlieb Mittelberger Warns His Countryman of the Perils of Emigration, 1750- http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5713
-Indentured Servants–“A Person Like Me, Oppress’d By Dame Fortune, Need Not Care Where He Goes”: The “Infortunate” William Moraley Tries His Luck in America, 1729- http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6229
-Indentured Servants–“We Unfortunate English People Suffer Here”: An English Servant Writes Home: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5796
-Indentured Servants–“Work and labor in this new and wild land are very hard”: A German Migrant in Philadelphia, 1750: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5712
Native Americans–“I Believe It Is Because I Am a Poor Indian”: Samsom Occom’s Life as an Indian Minister: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5788
Native Americans–“The Moment That The Snows Are Melted The Indian Women Begin Their Work”: Iroquois Women Work the Fields: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5827
Slaves–“As much land as they can handle”: Johann Bolzius Writes to Germany About Slave Labor in Carolina and Georgia, 1750: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6591
-Slaves–“Is It Not Enough that We Are Torn From Our Country and Friends?”: Olaudah Equiano Describes the Horrors of the Middle Passage, 1780s: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6372
Slaves–“To Redeem My Family”: Venture Smith Frees Himself and his Family: http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/6536