Jane is a 24-year-old pediatric nurse who identifies herself as African American. Her brother

Jane is a 24-year-old pediatric nurse who identifies herself as African American. Her brother has sickle cell disease, and she knows that she is a carrier. She understands the genetics of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) and the risk to her children if she marries someone who is also a carrier. Jane is very active in human rights groups and insists that race is a social and cultural idea with no biological basis. One of Janes coworkers is a member of the same human rights group, but he sees race differently. He tells Jane that he believes that there are biological determinants of race and points out physical features that many African Americans share. 1. How can ideas about the geographic origin of ones ancestors help Jane and her friend come to terms with their differences of opinion? 2. What concepts from population genetics could you use to help explain physical differences that people attribute to race? 3. Is there value in retaining categories such as race and ethnicity? If there is no biological support for categories such as race and ethnicity, why bother to retain these terms? 4. How could Janes knowledge about SCD help her and her coworker understand human genetic variation?

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