Is mining uranium on Native lands really environmental racism? Doesn’t the mining work provide jobs and extract a product we need for our national security? How do you respond to Native Americans who have their own thoughts about environmental ethics and their own unique indigenous ecology (as covered in this week’s materials)? Do some ethical considerations override others in this case? Attached is the t​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‌‍‍​extbook with readings on this topic. During the week, please read the following selections from Part IX of your textbook, Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach: Ramona Ilea’s “Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions” William Baxter’s “A ‘Good’ Environment: Just One of the Set of Human Objectives” Trish Glazebrook’s “Women and Climate Change: A Case Study from Northeast Ghana” Gregory Cajete’s “Look to the Mountain: Reflections on Indigenous Ecology” Shari Collins-Chobanian’s “Environmental Racism, American Indians, and Monitored Retrievabl​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‌‍‍​e Storage Sites for Radioactive Waste

Is mining uranium on Native lands really environmental racism? Doesn’t the mining work provide jobs and extract a product we need for our national security? How do you respond to Native Americans who have their own thoughts about environmental ethics and their own unique indigenous ecology (as covered in this week’s materials)? Do some ethical considerations override others in this case? Attached is the t​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‌‍‍​extbook with readings on this topic. During the week, please read the following selections from Part IX of your textbook, Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach: Ramona Ilea’s “Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions” William Baxter’s “A ‘Good’ Environment: Just One of the Set of Human Objectives” Trish Glazebrook’s “Women and Climate Change: A Case Study from Northeast Ghana” Gregory Cajete’s “Look to the Mountain: Reflections on Indigenous Ecology” Shari Collins-Chobanian’s “Environmental Racism, American Indians, and Monitored Retrievabl​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‌‍‍​e Storage Sites for Radioactive Waste

The post Is mining uranium on Native lands really environmental racism? Doesn’t the mining work provide jobs and extract a product we need for our national security? How do you respond to Native Americans who have their own thoughts about environmental ethics and their own unique indigenous ecology (as covered in this week’s materials)? Do some ethical considerations override others in this case? Attached is the t​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‌‍‍​extbook with readings on this topic. During the week, please read the following selections from Part IX of your textbook, Applied Ethics: A Multicultural Approach: Ramona Ilea’s “Intensive Livestock Farming: Global Trends, Increased Environmental Concerns, and Ethical Solutions” William Baxter’s “A ‘Good’ Environment: Just One of the Set of Human Objectives” Trish Glazebrook’s “Women and Climate Change: A Case Study from Northeast Ghana” Gregory Cajete’s “Look to the Mountain: Reflections on Indigenous Ecology” Shari Collins-Chobanian’s “Environmental Racism, American Indians, and Monitored Retrievabl​‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‌‍‍​e Storage Sites for Radioactive Waste first appeared on essaypanel.com.