If it is inappropriate or impossible to do your own interview, many insights can be gained from…

If it is inappropriate or impossible to do your own interview, many insights can be gained from paying attention to the detail of interviews in other settings. Students may have access to television, radio, newspaper or magazine interviews with a variety of respondents: these may be politicians, experts, lay campaigners, media celebrities or simply members of the general public. Select one or more of these interviews for analysis and then watch, listen to or read them with the following in mind: * How does the setting influence the content or manner of the interview? * How does the
If it is inappropriate or impossible to do your own interview, many insights can be gained from paying attention to the detail of interviews in other settings. Students may have access to television, radio, newspaper or magazine interviews with a variety of respondents: these may be politicians, experts, lay campaigners, media celebrities or simply members of the general public. Select one or more of these interviews for analysis and then watch, listen to or read them with the following in mind: * How does the setting influence the content or manner of the interview? * How does the world-view (epistemological position) of the interviewer or interviewee affect their questions or response? Is this position implicit or explicit? * How is the main topic of the interview approached? * Do certain types or styles of question produce different answers? * What particular aspects of replies are explored further? How is this done? * In a political interview, for example, this may be by challenging the interviewee, which one would not normally expect in a social research interview. What effect does this have? How might it be approached differently?