hy did you choose your research question? Why is it crucial to understand the response? (Why should people be interested in your research?) d. Discuss the state of the literature at the moment. Cite at least one study that addresses

How often do cannabis users use alcohol, tobacco, painkillers, etc. as alternatives or in addition to cannabis?
a. Why did you choose your research question? Why is it crucial to understand the response? (Why should people be interested in your research?)
d. Discuss the state of the literature at the moment. Cite at least one study that addresses the issue raised by your research (you are allowed to cite a study assigned during the course). What kind of data was used in the study, and what were the outcomes? Why not, if there is no literature currently available that addresses your research question? (Isn’t the research question intriguing?) a challenge to respond? missing data, etc.)

e. Which specific dataset(s) would you choose if you were to add to the body of knowledge with your own study? (For instance, statistics from the NSDUH or another cannabis use survey, sales and tax information from Colorado, Washington, Canada, etc.) Describe a fictitious ideal dataset or an experiment or survey you could undertake to gather the data if a necessary dataset does not already exist or is not publically available.

f. Research and evaluate at least two high-quality datasets online that you could use for your study. Give site addresses and a description of the datasets.

g. Describe the method you would use to answer your research question. You do not need to specify the econometric model. (E.g., if you were interested in the effect of legalization on the demand for Taco Bell, you might compare the number of Taco Bells in states where cannabis is legalized to the number of Taco Bells states where cannabis is prohibited, controlling for factors such as the states’ populations).
Overview

Patients may be more likely to ask doctors about marijuana’s possible negative and positive impacts on health given the quickly changing landscape surrounding its legalization for medical and recreational use. The prevailing belief appears to be that marijuana is a safe vice whose use shouldn’t be restricted or outlawed. Marijuana is currently the most widely used “illicit” substance in the United States, with about 12% of those 12 years of age and over reporting use in the previous year. Young people use marijuana at particularly high rates. 1 Inhalation is the most typical method of administration. Smoking devices including cigarettes, cigars, pipes, and bongs all use the Cannabis sativa plant’s shredded, greenish-gray leaves and flowers, along with stems and seeds.

In cigarettes, cigars, pipes, water pipes, or “blunts,” the stems and seeds of the Cannabis sativa plant are also smoked together with the plant’s shredded greenish-gray leaves and flowers (marijuana rolled in the tobacco-leaf wrapper from a cigar). Hashish, a similar substance made from the resin of marijuana flowers, is typically smoked (alone or in combination with tobacco), however it can also be taken orally. Additionally, marijuana can be used to make tea, and its oil-based extract can be added to foods.

Regular marijuana use among teenagers is particularly concerning because it’s linked to a higher risk of negative outcomes for this age group.

2 (Table 1). Despite the fact that numerous studies have noted negative outcomes, others have not, and the subject of why marijuana is harmful remains the subject of heated debate.