How well-written is the essay? You’ll want to consider what he hoped to accomplish and how likely it was that the essay would have accomplished his goals.

For many people, the words critic, critical, critique, and criticism have negative connotations. If using a different word has a more balanced connotation
for you, use it instead. You want to discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Brett Frischmann’s
“There’s Nothing Wrong with Being a Luddite.” Your job isn’t to “tear him a new one”! Instead, you should give your assessment of the merits of his essay.
Chapter 2 of Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum focuses on writing critiques. The authors organized the chapter around two broad questions:
1) To what extent does the author succeed in his or her purpose?
2) To what extent do you agree with the author?
Summarize the source material. In this case, communicate Frischmann’s
and main points.
Goal 2—Critique the source material. In this case, you will need to evaluate
Frischmann’s essay.
Three broad questions can help guide your thinking as you evaluate his essay.
Question 1—How well-written is the essay? You’ll want to consider what he hoped to
accomplish and how likely it was that the essay would have accomplished his
goals.
Question 2—To what extent do you agree with the author?