How does utilitarian thinking encourage businesses to bribe employees, including many of the biggest and most well-known enterprises in the world? How can governments lower the advantages while raising the costs of corporate bribes?

The purpose of this task is to help students understand the broad negative effects of unethical decisions at all levels—individual, corporate, and national.
Instructions: Please respond to the following questions in an essay format, citing the texts and materials you used this week. A minimum of 600 words, two sources, one of which can be the textbook, and APA formatting are required for your essay.

How does utilitarian thinking encourage businesses to bribe employees, including many of the biggest and most well-known enterprises in the world?
How can governments lower the advantages while raising the costs of corporate bribes?
Should businesses found guilty of bribery be forced to pay for the societal damage they do in the nations where the kickbacks occur?
How would you calculate the costs associated with societal harm?
Would requiring apologies and reparations help to reduce corporate bribery?
Do you agree that avoiding corruption is more profitable in the long run? Why or why not?
Overview

Stories of bribery are all too typical in the business sector. Giving someone presents of money—in cash or kind—in order to influence them to make judgments that are prejudiced in favor of business interests is referred to as bribery. Bribery is prohibited in the US because it is viewed as an unfair commercial practice. Bribery may not be regarded as corrupt, though, and is frequently accepted as the standard mode of doing business.

What transpires therefore when American businesses conduct business in nations that are more accepting of bribery? The New York Times reported in 2012 that Walmart had been paying bribes to get licenses and increase its market dominance in Mexico. The incident sparked numerous inquiries, leaving the business rushing to repair its reputation. To gain a deeper understanding of how companies may end up in a similar situation, let’s examine a case study.

An American business with a sales office in a Latin American nation is the fictional Starnes-Brenner Machine Tool Company. Frank, a seasoned salesman who is about ready to retire, gets replaced by Bill overseas. Bill learns during training that Frank had been paying the government official engineer $1,200 each machine to certify that the machines were in good working order. Additionally, he bribed the dock manager to hasten the machine transfer. Frank frequently paid bribes to advance sales as well.

Bill is horrified and explains that the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act makes it illegal to pay a government official (or the FCPA). The FCPA is a federal legislation in the United States that prohibits American companies, persons, and people of American nationality to influence foreign government officials by paying bribes.