How do historical subjects’ acts differ depending on memory and narrative? Are people held captive by the influence of story and communal memory?

How do historical subjects’ acts differ depending on memory and narrative? Are people held captive by the influence of story and communal memory?
Overview

Even when examining the same event, is it feasible for history to be documented in more than one way? Without a doubt, the answer is yes. You may have even had such an encounter. Maybe you remember beating your brother in a game of 21 when you were youngsters, but he remembers winning.

This is where the idea of historical memory and any resulting biases enter the picture. Let’s review these ideas during this class.

Past versus History
We need to be clear on the definitions of history and the past before we can discuss historical memory. The past is the totality of everything that has ever occurred anywhere in the world.

This might involve battles, supernova explosions, the wedding of your cousin Tim, Brazil winning the FIFA World Cup, or Julius Caesar debating what to eat for breakfast the morning he was assassinated. That is all in the past.

History and the past are frequently used interchangeably, but they should be kept apart. History is the study, interpretation, and documentation of previous events and memories in a manner that gives people’s lives purpose. That 21 game you and your brother played is in the past. It belongs to the past. Your assessment of the outcome is recorded in history. To help you recall that history is a story or perception of the past, consider the word “story” in its whole.

Historical memory
Now that you know the difference between the two, let’s discuss what historical memory is. Historical memory is the process by which social groups produce and then come to identify with particular narratives about historical eras or events. Historical memory, often known as collective memory or social memory, depends on factors such as:

Family memories are memories that are made and then passed down from one generation to the next.

When a religious organization is significant to a group of people’s narrative and hence memory production, there is a religious memory.