Describe how do your sources help students learn about the historical context of the events and why each source is a great source for each event and how it relates to the event presented in the chapter.

Based on our Takaki and Zinn readings from this week and last, I would like you to respond to the prompts below.QuestionsThis question is the same as last week. It asks you to reflect on your learning of the content. What perspectives in these chapters are new to you or that you did not know in high school? If you have been exposed to them, when were they presented and by whom? Then answer the prompts for B.Why do you think you had not been exposed to them?Why would it be important for students to hear these perspectives?How does this relate to social justice? (You should specifically reference and cite our previous readings)How does this relate to our purposes of social studies? (You should specifically reference and cite our previous readings)Pick two events from these chapters (they need to be for different chapters). Find a written primary source for the first event and a visual primary source for the second event (This means you should have two total sources).Describe how do your sources help students learn about the historical context of the events and why each source is a great source for each event and how it relates to the event presented in the chapter.Build a meaningful question for each event you think these sources would help students answer about the event. Explain why your questions are meaningful.3. Respond: Analyze two peers’ posts,Give them feedback on if their sources are primary sources. If they are not primary sources, please explain to your peer why they are not.Then justify why you think or do not think the sources would be helpful in promoting students’ learning about the events.Lastly, evaluate if the questions are meaningful and give evidence for your conclusion. Use your knowledge of the event, the sources, and the question to decide if the question is meaningful.