Consider the looping plume form due to windy conditions, and recall that the Gaussian model presumes a normal curve distribution. What problems do you perceive that a Gaussian model might pose when attempting to exclusively use this model in variable wind areas? Do you think these factors are considered enough in issuing pollution forecasts when frontal systems affect urban areas? Why, or why not?

ALSO PLEASE REPLY TO ANOTHER STUDENTS COMMENT BELOW 
JOSEPH:
Winds in general have different directional outputs as they move through the air, the effects it has as described in the text change through surface roughness and wind speed as it goes through urban and rural areas. So, the only problem I perceive is that most readings are from a horizontal standpoint and those numbers reflect both wind velocity and direction. The horizontal pressure that is found assumes the temperature gradients which is vital in knowing the wind affects. While the Gaussian Model assumes the approach of vertical directions centered around downwind and this approach differs. Which is why I don’t think it’s considered enough because of this and at times differs from North and South wind readings. Each area will have different temperatures and this affects most wind areas over time. 
References
Godish, T., Davis, W. T., & Fu, J. S. (2014). Air quality (5th ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.